The Relationship between WTC Level and LLS Use among Turkish EFL Learners

Ali Merç [1]

323 411

Recent investigations in the field of applied linguistics have tended to transfer psychological concepts into second language acquisition. Willingness to communicate, as a psychological concept, has been taken as a research topic in the field. On the other hand, language learning strategy use has been accepted as a notion affecting the success in second/foreign language learning. In this respect, this study investigates the relationship between the levels of Willingness to Communicate inside the Classroom (WTC) and Language Learning Strategy (LLS) use among Turkish university students. 80 first-year university students responded to two questionnaires: WTC questionnaire developed by McIntyre et al (2001) and the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL), version 5.1 by Oxford (1990). The results of the quantitative analyses, first, revealed that Turkish EFL learners were willing to communicate in the classroom in a range from half of the time to usually willing in both overall mean score and in separate components such as speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension. Second, the participants were found to be medium strategy users. Finally, correlation analyses showed that there was a significant positive correlation between these two concepts. In specific, certain aspects of the levels of WTC inside classroom matched with certain sub-components of the SILL. After the study, a number of recommendations for language learning and teaching as well as some implications for further research are provided
Willingness to Communicate, Language Learning Strategies, Language
  • distinctions can be examined. Furthermore, this study was a preliminary attempt to explain the
  • relationship between LLS use and WTC. Some other studies can be conducted to examine the
  • relationship of LLS use and WTC with other social, affective, and cognitive factors affecting
  • successful L2 learning.
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Yazar: Ali Merç

Bibtex @ { ajesi18768, journal = {Anadolu Üniversitesi Eğitim Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi}, issn = {2146-4014}, address = {Anadolu Üniversitesi}, year = {2015}, volume = {4}, pages = {133 - }, doi = {10.18039/ajesi.01893}, title = {The Relationship between WTC Level and LLS Use among Turkish EFL Learners}, key = {cite}, author = {Merç, Ali} }
APA Merç, A . (2015). The Relationship between WTC Level and LLS Use among Turkish EFL Learners. Anadolu Üniversitesi Eğitim Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi, 4 (2), . DOI: 10.18039/ajesi.01893
MLA Merç, A . "The Relationship between WTC Level and LLS Use among Turkish EFL Learners". Anadolu Üniversitesi Eğitim Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi 4 (2015): <http://dergipark.gov.tr/ajesi/issue/1531/18768>
Chicago Merç, A . "The Relationship between WTC Level and LLS Use among Turkish EFL Learners". Anadolu Üniversitesi Eğitim Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi 4 (2015):
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - The Relationship between WTC Level and LLS Use among Turkish EFL Learners AU - Ali Merç Y1 - 2015 PY - 2015 N1 - doi: 10.18039/ajesi.01893 DO - 10.18039/ajesi.01893 T2 - Anadolu Üniversitesi Eğitim Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 133 EP - VL - 4 IS - 2 SN - 2146-4014- M3 - doi: 10.18039/ajesi.01893 UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.18039/ajesi.01893 Y2 - 2018 ER -
EndNote %0 Anadolu Üniversitesi Eğitim Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi The Relationship between WTC Level and LLS Use among Turkish EFL Learners %A Ali Merç %T The Relationship between WTC Level and LLS Use among Turkish EFL Learners %D 2015 %J Anadolu Üniversitesi Eğitim Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi %P 2146-4014- %V 4 %N 2 %R doi: 10.18039/ajesi.01893 %U 10.18039/ajesi.01893
ISNAD Merç, Ali . "The Relationship between WTC Level and LLS Use among Turkish EFL Learners". Anadolu Üniversitesi Eğitim Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi 4 / 2 (Nisan 2015): 133-. http://dx.doi.org/10.18039/ajesi.01893