Yıl 2019, Cilt , Sayı , Sayfalar 1 - 27 2019-01-31

Mobilization Follies in International Relations: A Multimethod Exploration of Why Some Decision Makers Fail to Avoid War When Public Mobilization as a Bargaining Tool Fails

Konstantinos Travlos [1]

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This paper is intended to serve as a show and tell model for graduate students. Sections in parentheses and italics provide a running commentary by the author on the decisions taken throughout the paper. The goal is to permit students to follow the thinking of the researcher and see how it guided the theoretical, methodological and other decisions on content that finally made it into the paper. The paper in question explores how “public” military mobilization can be an attempt by weak actors to trigger intervention by third parties in a dispute with a stronger actor, in the hopes that the third parties will force the stronger actor to accommodate the weaker actor. This attempt is called “compellence via proxy”. In this research I explore why in reaction to failure, some weak actors are able to avoid escalation to war, while others are not. I posit that the flexibility of the decision makers of the weak actors is influenced by their ability to overhaul their winning coalition. A large-n evaluation of 68 cases of “public” mobilization, and an evaluation of six Balkan state mobilizations in the 1878-1909 era, do not support the idea that the size of the winning coalition, a part of the factors determining overhaul, has an association with war onset or its avoidance. 

Military mobilization, war, winning coalition, rationalist theory of war, crisis
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Yazar: Konstantinos Travlos

Bibtex @araştırma makalesi { allazimuth477341, journal = {All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace}, issn = {2146-7757}, address = {Center for Foreign Policy and Peace Research, İhsan Doğramacı Peace Foundation}, year = {2019}, volume = {}, pages = {1 - 27}, doi = {10.20991/allazimuth.477341}, title = {Mobilization Follies in International Relations: A Multimethod Exploration of Why Some Decision Makers Fail to Avoid War When Public Mobilization as a Bargaining Tool Fails}, key = {cite}, author = {Travlos, Konstantinos} }
APA Travlos, K . (2019). Mobilization Follies in International Relations: A Multimethod Exploration of Why Some Decision Makers Fail to Avoid War When Public Mobilization as a Bargaining Tool Fails. All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace, (), 1-27. DOI: 10.20991/allazimuth.477341
MLA Travlos, K . "Mobilization Follies in International Relations: A Multimethod Exploration of Why Some Decision Makers Fail to Avoid War When Public Mobilization as a Bargaining Tool Fails". All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace (2019): 1-27 <http://dergipark.gov.tr/allazimuth/issue/42171/477341>
Chicago Travlos, K . "Mobilization Follies in International Relations: A Multimethod Exploration of Why Some Decision Makers Fail to Avoid War When Public Mobilization as a Bargaining Tool Fails". All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace (2019): 1-27
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - Mobilization Follies in International Relations: A Multimethod Exploration of Why Some Decision Makers Fail to Avoid War When Public Mobilization as a Bargaining Tool Fails AU - Konstantinos Travlos Y1 - 2019 PY - 2019 N1 - doi: 10.20991/allazimuth.477341 DO - 10.20991/allazimuth.477341 T2 - All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 1 EP - 27 VL - IS - SN - 2146-7757- M3 - doi: 10.20991/allazimuth.477341 UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.20991/allazimuth.477341 Y2 - 2019 ER -
EndNote %0 All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace Mobilization Follies in International Relations: A Multimethod Exploration of Why Some Decision Makers Fail to Avoid War When Public Mobilization as a Bargaining Tool Fails %A Konstantinos Travlos %T Mobilization Follies in International Relations: A Multimethod Exploration of Why Some Decision Makers Fail to Avoid War When Public Mobilization as a Bargaining Tool Fails %D 2019 %J All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace %P 2146-7757- %V %N %R doi: 10.20991/allazimuth.477341 %U 10.20991/allazimuth.477341
ISNAD Travlos, Konstantinos . "Mobilization Follies in International Relations: A Multimethod Exploration of Why Some Decision Makers Fail to Avoid War When Public Mobilization as a Bargaining Tool Fails". All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace / (Ocak 2019): 1-27. http://dx.doi.org/10.20991/allazimuth.477341