Yıl 2018, Cilt 9, Sayı 4, Sayfalar 405 - 422 2018-10-16

“It’s the Combination That Works”: Evaluating Student Experiences with a Multi-element Blended Design in First-year Law

Ekaterina Pechenkina [1] , Amanda Scardamaglia [2] , Janet Gregory [3]

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This mixed method study involved twenty students enrolled in three consecutive intakes of an Australian Bachelor of Laws program’s introductory unit. Pioneering a multi-element blended design, the unit featured three key elements: summary videos, self-test online quizzes and interactive discussion boards. These elements were chosen based on evidence-based research into digital tools found effective in enhancing students’ face-to-face learning experience in blended and fully online designs. The study’s main goal was to evaluate how students utilized these elements and in what ways their previous experiences with blended designs influenced their learning process in this unit. A focus-group and online surveys were used to collect data. Based on literature review, four areas of student experience with this blended designs formed a particular focus of this study: student expectations, support, resources, and collaboration. It was found that students extensively used videos and quizzes for catch-up, revision, and clarification, while discussion boards were not perceived as useful, with students preferring to have discussions face-to-face, in and out of classroom. Findings also indicated that students’ expectations of and previous experiences with blended learning can be leveraged to strengthen blended designs.   

Blended learning, Videos, Quizzes, Discussion boards, Law program, Student experiences
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Birincil Dil en
Konular
Dergi Bölümü Makaleler
Yazarlar

Yazar: Ekaterina Pechenkina (Sorumlu Yazar)
Ülke: Australia


Yazar: Amanda Scardamaglia
Ülke: Australia


Yazar: Janet Gregory
Ülke: Australia


Bibtex @araştırma makalesi { cet471019, journal = {Contemporary Educational Technology}, issn = {}, eissn = {1309-517X}, address = {Ali ŞİMŞEK}, year = {2018}, volume = {9}, pages = {405 - 422}, doi = {10.30935/cet.471019}, title = {“It’s the Combination That Works”: Evaluating Student Experiences with a Multi-element Blended Design in First-year Law}, key = {cite}, author = {Gregory, Janet and Pechenkina, Ekaterina and Scardamaglia, Amanda} }
APA Pechenkina, E , Scardamaglia, A , Gregory, J . (2018). “It’s the Combination That Works”: Evaluating Student Experiences with a Multi-element Blended Design in First-year Law. Contemporary Educational Technology, 9 (4), 405-422. DOI: 10.30935/cet.471019
MLA Pechenkina, E , Scardamaglia, A , Gregory, J . "“It’s the Combination That Works”: Evaluating Student Experiences with a Multi-element Blended Design in First-year Law". Contemporary Educational Technology 9 (2018): 405-422 <http://dergipark.gov.tr/cet/issue/39761/471019>
Chicago Pechenkina, E , Scardamaglia, A , Gregory, J . "“It’s the Combination That Works”: Evaluating Student Experiences with a Multi-element Blended Design in First-year Law". Contemporary Educational Technology 9 (2018): 405-422
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - “It’s the Combination That Works”: Evaluating Student Experiences with a Multi-element Blended Design in First-year Law AU - Ekaterina Pechenkina , Amanda Scardamaglia , Janet Gregory Y1 - 2018 PY - 2018 N1 - doi: 10.30935/cet.471019 DO - 10.30935/cet.471019 T2 - Contemporary Educational Technology JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 405 EP - 422 VL - 9 IS - 4 SN - -1309-517X M3 - doi: 10.30935/cet.471019 UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.30935/cet.471019 Y2 - 2018 ER -
EndNote %0 Contemporary Educational Technology “It’s the Combination That Works”: Evaluating Student Experiences with a Multi-element Blended Design in First-year Law %A Ekaterina Pechenkina , Amanda Scardamaglia , Janet Gregory %T “It’s the Combination That Works”: Evaluating Student Experiences with a Multi-element Blended Design in First-year Law %D 2018 %J Contemporary Educational Technology %P -1309-517X %V 9 %N 4 %R doi: 10.30935/cet.471019 %U 10.30935/cet.471019
ISNAD Pechenkina, Ekaterina , Scardamaglia, Amanda , Gregory, Janet . "“It’s the Combination That Works”: Evaluating Student Experiences with a Multi-element Blended Design in First-year Law". Contemporary Educational Technology 9 / 4 (Ekim 2018): 405-422. http://dx.doi.org/10.30935/cet.471019