Yazım Kuralları

GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS

The submitted manuscripts or substantial parts of them should not have been previously published or submitted for publication somewhere else. The abbreviated version of the contents for presentation at a meeting is not regarded as a publication.

All authors ensure that they have furnished a substantial contribution to the paper and that they are in agreement with form and contents of the manuscript. Corresponding authors confirm that they hold the copyrights to their articles as well as to the text and illustrations attached therein in the authors´ contract. If material (e.g., illustrations or tables) is used from other sources, authors must submit a written statement from the holder(s) of the copyright(s) indicating they have obtained permission to publish this material in jomat. The authors of articles published by jomat grant jomat the right to store the articles in its databases for an unlimited period of time and to distribute and reproduce the articles electronically. The authors retain all remaining exploitation rights to their articles, subject to the condition that any further use of the articles shall make reference to their original publication in jomat ("originally published in JOMAT").

Authors should indicate, either in their cover letter or in the title page, whether the research reported in their paper was the result of a for-pay consulting relationship or if they or their employer has a financial interest in the topic of the paper which might constitute a conflict of interest.

In general, papers may be of any length but should be self-contained. Further, they should provide new findings or deal with new methods.

Supplementary material, such as data sets etc., should be submitted together with the manuscript.

Authors who would like to submit replications.

Authors should have in mind that, as soon as a paper is accepted as discussion paper, it will promptly be published (without any editorial changes).

Authors are asked to suggest potential reviewers. Ideally, these reviewers should be researchers who are not closely associated with the author (i.e., who are do not work at an affiliated institution and who have not collaborated significantly with the author on research). Should this not be the case, authors are requested to so indicate. All suggested reviewers should be able to offer fair and impartial reviews of the material being submitted. When a paper is accepted as a discussion paper, the editorial office of jomat sends the paper to these reviewers for comment.  

There is no submission and publication fees or page charges.

Authors are asked to register as registered readers in order to be able to respond to comments submitted to the discussion platform for their paper.

After the discussion platform is closed, authors are free to submit a revised manuscript for publication in JOMAT. Authors who intend to do so should inform the editorial office. 

Authors can post revised versions of their articles anytime in response to the public peer review. 

 

GUIDELINES FOR MANUSCRIPTS

Submission

Papers should be submitted electronically. Please, click on to submit manuscript.

 

Data Sets

Authors are required to provide mathematical derivations and underlying data sets together with their papers to ensure that the results of a paper are quickly comprehensible to interested readers. Papers can be accompanied by supplementary material, such as PowerPoint presentations, to help to elucidate and disseminate underlying ideas.

 

Language

Papers should be clear, concise, well organized, and written in English, with correct spelling and good sentence structure. Authors are responsible for the use of correct language, although the editors and the referees are kindly asked to help in language editing of the manuscript if necessary.

 

Manuscript Layout

1) The main document should contain the title, abstract, 4 to 5 keywords, text, appendices, notes, references, each table and figure. Tables and figures should be properly embedded in the manuscript. Footnotes in the paper should be numbered consecutively. 

2) Abstract is to be 200 words or less. A concise and factual abstract is required. The abstract should state briefly the purpose of the research, the principal results and major conclusions.

3) There are no absolute word count requirements, but target lengths for research notes are 3,000 to 5,000 words all inclusive. A typical manuscript will not exceed 12,000 words.

 

References

The reference list should appear at the end of the text, with hyperlinks to full-text papers on the Web, and should start on a new page. Issue numbers should be provided for all journals cited in the references and should be APA Style. For correct referencing through APA, below links can be advised for more information; http://supp.apa.org/style/PM6E-Corrected-Sample-Papers.pdf

Book with one Author or Editor

The general format below refers to a book with one author. 

 

If you are dealing with one editor instead of one author, you would simply insert the editor's name in the place where the author's name is now, followed by "(Ed.)" without the quotation marks.  The rest of the format would remain the same. 

General Format 

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): 

      (Author Surname, Year)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname, Year, page number)

     References:

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. (Year). Book title: Subtitle. Place of

            Publication: Publisher.  

Example

        In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): 

      (Franks, 2005)

        In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Franks, 2005, p. 148)

       References:

      Franks, A. (2005). Margaret Sanger's eugenic legacy: The control of female fertility.

            Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company.

 Book with Two Authors or Editors

 The general format below refers to a book with two authors. 

 If you are dealing with two editors instead of two authors, you would simply insert the names of the editors into the place where the authors' names are now, followed by "(Eds.)" without the quotation marks (see the Example).  The rest of the format would remain the same. 

General Format 

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): 

      (Author Surname & Author Surname, Year)

      In-Text Citation (Direct Quote):

      (Author Surname & Author Surname, Year, page number)

       References:

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial., & Author Surname, First Initial.

            Second Initial. (Year). Book title: Subtitle. Place of Publication: Publisher.

Example  

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): 

      (Burley & Harris, 2002)

 

      In-Text Citation (Direct Quote):

      (Burley & Harris, 2002, p. 153)

 

      References:

      Burley, J., & Harris, J. (Eds.). (2002). A companion to genethics. Malden, MA: Blackwell. 

Book with Three to Five Authors or Editors

 The general format below refers to a book with three authors.  For a book with four or five authors, you would add the additional authors' names after the first three.

 If you are dealing with a book that has three to five editors instead of authors, you would simply insert the names of the editors into the place where the authors' names are now, followed by "(Eds.)" without the quotation marks (as per the example).  The rest of the format would remain the same.

  General Format  

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): 

      (Author Surname, Author Surname, & Author Surname, Year)

       NOTE: Although the first in-text citation for a work with three to five authors/editors

      includes all of the names of the authors/editors, subsequent citations include

      only the first author's/editor's surname, followed by et al. and the year.

       In-Text Citation (Direct Quote):

      (Author Surname, Author Surname, & Author Surname, Year, page number)

       References:

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial., Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial., & Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. (Year). Book title: Subtitle. Place of Publication: Publisher.

  Example  

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): 

      (Johnson, Roberts, & Worell, 1999)

       NOTE: A subsequent citation would appear as (Johnson et al., 1999)

       In-Text Citation (Direct Quote):

      (Johnson, Roberts, & Worell, 1999, p. 72)

       References:

      Johnson, N. G., Roberts, M. C., & Worell, J. (Eds.). (1999). Beyond appearance: A new look at adolescent girls. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

 Article or Chapter in an Edited Book 

General Format

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname [of Chapter or Article], Year)  

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname [of Chapter or Article], Year, page number) 

      References (Quotation):

      Author Surname [of Chapter or Article], First Initial. Second Initial. (Year). Article

            or chapter title. In Editor First Initial. Second Initial. Surname (Ed.), Book title:

            Subtitle (pp. page range of article or chapter). Place of Publication: Publisher.

Example 

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Lawrence & Dodds, 2003)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Lawrence & Dodds, 2003, p. 526)

      References:

      Lawrence, J. A., &  Dodds, A. E. (2003). Goal-directed activities and life-span

            development. In J. Valsiner & K. Connolly (Eds.), Handbook of developmental

            psychology (pp. 517-533). London, England: Sage Publications.

 Article in a Reference Book 

General Format

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname [of Article], Year)

          In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname [of Article], Year, page number)

       References (Quotation):

      Author Surname [of Article], First Initial. Second Initial. (Year). Article title.

            In Editor First Initial. Second Initial. Surname (Ed.), Reference book title: Subtitle

            (# ed. edition, Vol. volume #, pp. page range of article). Place of Publication:

            Publisher.

 Example

 

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Lindgren, 1994)

       In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Lindgren, 1994, p.468)

       References:

      Lindgren, H. C. (1994). Stereotyping. In Encyclopedia of psychology (Vol. 3, pp.

            468-469). New York, NY: Wiley.

Book with no Author

 General Format

 

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Book title [usually shortened], Year)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Book title [usually shortened], Year, page number)

      References:

      Book title: Subtitle. (Year). Place of Publication: Publisher.

 Example

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Merriam-Webster's, 2005)

       In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Merriam-Webster's, 2005, p. 3)

      References:

      Merriam-Webster's collegiate dictionary (11th ed.). (2005). Springfield,

            MA: Merriam-Webster.

E-Book

 General Format

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname, Year)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname, Year, page number)

      References: Whole Book

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. (Year). Book title: Subtitle [Version].

            doi:xx.xxxxxxxxx OR Retrieved date from URL of the home page of the e-book

            provider.

     References: Chapter

      Author, A. A. (Year Published). Name of Chapter/Article. In A. Editor & B. Editor (Eds.),

      Name of Book[Version]. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxx OR Retrieved (date) from URL of

      the home page of the e-book provider.

 Example

        In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

       (Ochs, 2004)

        In-Text Citation (Quotation):

       (Ochs, 2004, p. 55)

      References: Whole Book

      Ochs, S. (2004). A history of nerve functions: From animal spirits to molecular

            mechanisms [ebrary Reader version]. Retrieved September 1, 2011 from

            http://www.ebrary.com/corp/  

       References: Chapter

       Ochs, S. (2004). Introduction to molecular mechanisms. In A history of nerve

            functions: From animal spirits to molecular mechanisms [ebrary Reader version].

           Retrieved September 1, 2011 from http://www.ebrary.com/corp/

Edition of a Book other than the First

 Second edition = 2nd ed.

Third edition = 3rd ed.

Fourth edition = 4th ed.

Revised edition = Rev. ed. 

General Format

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname, Year)   

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname, Year, page number)

      References:

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. (Year). Book title: Subtitle (edition).

            Place of Publication: Publisher.

Example

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Harris, 2001)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Harris, 2001, p. 50)

      References:

      Harris, L. A. (2001). Canadian copyright law (3rd ed.). Toronto, ON: McGraw Hill

    Ryerson.

A Translation

General Format Book

Example Book Chapter (Reprinted English Translation)

      In-Text Citation:

      (Piaget, 1970/1988) 

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):     

      (Piaget, 1970/1988, p. 12)

Reference Book Chapter: (Reprinted English translation in a book chapter - see page 204)

Piaget, J. (1988). Extracts from Piaget's theory (G. Gellerier & J. Langer, Trans.). In K. Richardson & S. Sheldon (Eds.). Cognitive development to adolescence: A reader (pp. 3-18). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. (Reprinted from Manual of child psychology, pp. 703-732, by  L. Carmichael & P.H. Mussen, Ed., 1970, New York, NY: Wiley)

Example

Book (Non-English work provide the title in the original language and in brackets the English translation)

Kafka, F., & Höfle, P. (2012). Das Urteil und andere Erzählungen: Text und Kommentar [The verdict and other narratives: text and commentary].Frankfurt a.M: Suhrkamp.

Government Publication

APA Citation Style does not have a separate category for government publications.  According to APA, government documents can be considered Books, Technical/Research Reports or Brochures.

Helpful Tips:

 

Treat a government document as a book, report, or brochure.

If a person is named on the title page, use her or him as author.

If no person is named, use the government agency, department, or branch as a group author (Ex. 31, p.205).

Give the name of the group author exactly as it appears on the title page. If the branch or agency is not well known, include its higher department first.

If the group author is also the publisher, just use the word Author after the location (p. 203).

If there is a series or report number, include it after the title (p. 205).

The manual refers to the GPO (U.S. Gov. Printing Office). Canadian equivalents may be: Queen’s Printer, Ministry of Supply and Services, Canadian Government Publishing, etc.

General Format

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname OR Name of Government Organization, Year)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname OR Name of Government Organization, Year, page number)

      References:

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. OR Government Name. Name of

            Government Agency. (Year). Title: Subtitle (Report No. xxx [if available]). Place of

            Publication: Publisher.

Example 1

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Gilmore et al., 1999)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Gilmore et al., 1999, p. 5)

      References:

      Gilmore, J., Woollam, P., Campbell, T., McLean, B., Roch, J., & Stephens, T. (1999).

            Statistical report on the health of Canadians: Prepared by the Federal, Provincial

            and Territorial Advisory Committee on Population Health. Charlottetown, PEI:

            Health Canada, Statistics Canada, Canadian Institute for Health Information


Example 2

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Edwards, Sims-Jones, Hotz, & Cushman, 1997)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Edwards, Sims-Jones, Hotz, & Cushman, 1997, p. 2)

      References:

      Edwards, N., Sims-Jones, N., Hotz, S., & Cushman, R. (1997). Development and

            testing components of a multifaceted intervention program to reduce the

            incidence of smoking relapse during pregnancy and post-partum of both

            women and their partners. Report prepared for Health Canada at the Community

            Health Research Unit, University of Ottawa, Canada.

Example 3

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Ontario Ministry of Health, 1994)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Ontario Ministry of Health, 1994, p. 7)

      References:

      Ontario Ministry of Health. (1994). Selected findings from the mental health supplement of the Ontario Health Survey. Ottawa, ON: Queen's Printer for Ontario.

 Example 4

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (U. S. Food and Drug Administration, 2004)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (U. S. Food and Drug Administration, 2004, p. 8)

      References:

      U. S. Food and Drug Administration/Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. (2004).

            Worsening depression and suicidality in patients being treated with antidepressant

            medications: FDA public health advisory. Washington, DC: Author.

 Journal Article with One Author

 Helpful Tips:            

 DOI: If a journal article has a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) listed, you will always include this identifier in your reference.  You will not have to include the URL of the journal's home page or of the database from which you retrieved the article if a DOI is available.

 Online Database: If you viewed a journal article in an online database and it does not have a DOI, you will need to do a quick search outside of the database to locate the URL for the journal's home page (pp. 191-192).  This information must be included in the reference.  If the journal is no longer being published and it does not have a home page, then include the URL for the home page of the database from which you retrieved the article (p. 192).

 Print: If you viewed a journal article in its print format, be sure to check if it has a DOI listed.  If it does not, your reference to the article would end after you provide the page range of the article.

 Date: When possible, include the year, month, and date in references. If the month and date are not available, use the year of publication.

 General Format

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname, Year)   

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname, Year, page number)

      References:

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. (Year). Article title: Subtitle. Journal Title,

            Volume(issue), page range. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxxx OR Retrieved from URL of journal

            home page [if available]. 

Example

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Pettigrew, 2009)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Pettigrew, 2009, p. 61)

       References:

      Pettigrew, T. F. (2009). Secondary transfer effect of contact: Do intergroup contact

            effects spread to noncontacted outgroups? Social Psychology, 40(2), 55-65.

            doi:10.1027/1864-9335.40.2.55

 Journal Article with Two Authors

 Helpful Tips:             

 If a journal article has a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) listed, you will always include this identifier in your reference.  You will not have to include the URL of the journal's home page or of the database from which you retrieved the article if a DOI is available

 If you viewed a journal article in an online database and it does not have a DOI, you will need to do a quick search outside of the database to locate the URL for the journal's home page (pp. 191-192).  This information must be included in the reference.  If the journal is no longer being published and it does not have a home page, then include the URL for the home page of the database from which you retrieved the article (p. 192).

 If you viewed a journal article in its print format, be sure to check if it has a DOI listed.  If it does not, your reference to the article would end after you provide the page range of the article.

 General Format

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname & Author Surname, Year)

       In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname & Author Surname, Year, page number)

      References:

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial., & Author Surname, First Initial. Second

            Initial. (Year). Article title: Subtitle. Journal Title, Volume(issue), page range.

            doi:xx.xxxxxxxxxx OR Retrieved from URL of journal home page [if available]. 

 Example 1

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Paterson & Thorne, 2003)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Paterson & Thorne, 2003, p. 30)

      References:

      Paterson, B. L., & Thorne, S. (2003). Enhancing the evaluation of nursing care

            effectiveness. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 35(3), 26-38.

Example 2

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Sillick & Schutte, 2006) 

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Sillick & Schutte, 2006, p. 43) 

      References:

      Sillick, T. J., & Schutte, N. S. (2006). Emotional intelligence and self-esteem mediate

            between perceived early parental love and adult happiness. E-Journal of Applied

            Psychology, 2(2), 38-48. Retrieved from http://ojs.lib.swin.edu.au/index.php/ejap 

Journal Article with Three to Seven Authors

 Helpful Tips: 

 If a journal article has a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) listed, you will always include this identifier in your reference.  You will not have to include the URL of the journal's home page or of the database from which you retrieved the article if a DOI is available.

If you viewed a journal article in an online database and it does not have a DOI, you will need to do a quick search outside of the database to locate the URL for the journal's home page (pp. 191-192).  This information must be included in the reference.  If the journal is no longer being published and it does not have a home page, then include the URL for the home page of the database from which you retrieved the article (p. 192).

 If you viewed a journal article in its print format, be sure to check if it has a DOI listed.  If it does not, your reference to the article would end after you provide the page range of the article.

 General Format 

        In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname, Author Surname, & Author Surname, Year)

NOTE: Although the first in-text citation for a work with three to five authors/editors includes all of the names of the authors/editors,subsequent citations include only the first author's/editor's surname,followed by et al. and the year.

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname, Author Surname, & Author Surname, Year, page number)

 References:

Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial., Author Surname, First Initial.Second Initial., & Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. (Year). Article title: Subtitle. Journal Title, Volume(issue), page range. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxxx OR Retrieved from URL of journal home page [if available].  

Example 1 (In-text citation rule for 3-5 authors)

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Westhues, Lafrance, & Schmidt, 2001)

      NOTE: A subsequent citation would appear as (Westhues et al., 2001) 

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Westhues, Lafrance, & Schmidt, 2001, p. 40)

References:

Westhues, A., Lafrance, J., & Schmidt, G. (2001). A SWOT analysis of social work education in Canada. Social Work Education, 20(1), 35-56.doi:10.1080/02615470020028364

 Example 2 (In-text citation rule for 6 authors or more)

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Dietz et al., 2007)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Dietz et al., 2007, p. 1518)

References:

Dietz, P. M., Williams, S. B., Callaghan, W. M., Bachman, D. J., Whitlock, E. P., & Hornbrook, M. C.     (2007).Clinically identified maternal depression before, during, and after pregnancies ending in live births. American Journal of Psychiatry, 164(10), 1515-1520. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2007.061118936

 Journal Article with Seven or More Authors

 Helpful Tips:

If a journal article has a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) listed, you will always include this identifier in your reference.  You will not have to include the URL of the journal's home page or of the database from which you retrieved the article if a DOI is available.

 If you viewed a journal article in an online database and it does not have a DOI, you will need to do a quick search outside of the database to locate the URL for the journal's home page (pp. 191-192).  This information must be included in the reference.  If the journal is no longer being published and it does not have a home page, then include the URL for the home page of the database from which you retrieved the article (p. 192).

If you viewed a journal article in its print format, be sure to check if it has a DOI listed.  If it does not, your reference to the article would end after you provide the page range of the article.  

 General Format

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname et al., Year)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname et al., Year, page number) 

      References:

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial., Author Surname, First Initial. Second

            Initial., Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial., Author Surname, First Initial.

            Second Initial., Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial., & Author Surname,

            First Initial. Second Initial. (Year). Article title: Subtitle. Journal Title, Volume(issue),

            page range. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxxx [if available] OR Retrieved from URL of journal

            home page [if available].

Example

 More than 7 authors - If the article has more than seven authors, list the names of

the first six authors followed by ... and then the last author's name in the

reference entry (p. 198).

 In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Yonkers et al., 2001, p. 1859)

     References:

Yonkers, K. A., Ramin, S. M., Rush, A. J., Navarrete, C. A., Carmody, T., March, D., . . . Leveno, K. J. (2001). Onset and persistence of postpartum depression in an inner-city maternal health clinic system. American Journal of Psychiatry, 158(11), 1856-1863. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.158.11.1856

Magazine Article

 Helpful Tips

If you view a magazine article online you will need to include the URL of the magazine's home page in your reference.

If you view a magazine article from within an article database you will have to do a quick search outside of the database to locate the home page for that particular magazine (p. 198).  You would include the URL of the magazine's home page in your reference.

General Format

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname, Year)

       In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname, Year, page number)

       References:

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. (Year, Month Day). Article title: Subtitle.

            Magazine Title, Volume(issue), page range. Retrieved from URL of magazine

            home page [if viewed online]. 

 Example 1

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Henry & Mehta, 1990)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Henry & Mehta, 1990, p. 30) 

      References:

      Henry, W. A., & Mehta, N. S. (1990, April 9). Beyond the melting pot. Time, 135, 28-31.

 Example 2

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Kuttner, 2003)

       In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Kutner, 2003, p. 26)

       References:

      Kuttner, R. (2003, September 8). The great American pension-fund robbery. Business

            Week, 24-26. Retrieved from http://www.businessweek.com/

 Newspaper Article

 General Format

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname, Year)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname, Year, page number)

      References:

      Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. (Year, Month Day). Article title: Subtitle.

            Newspaper Title, page range. Retrieved from URL [if viewed online]

Example 1

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Wallace, 2007)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Wallace, 2007, p. A8)

      References:

      Wallace, K. (2007, December 4). Passport applicant finds massive privacy breach. The

            Globe and Mail, pp. A1, A8.

 Example 2

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Severson & Martin, 2009)

       In-Text Citation (Quotation:

      (Severson & Martin, 2009)

       References:

      Severson, K. &, Martin, A. (2009, March 3). It's organic, but does that mean it's safer?

            The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com

Basic Web Page

 Helpful Tip

When citing sources that you find on the Internet you only need to include a retrieval date if the information you viewed is likely to change over time (p. 192).  If you reference an article from a news source (e.g., CNN, NBC, Washington Post) or a site that may experience continuous updates, you would then need to include a retrieval date.

General Format

       In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Author Surname, Year)  

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Author Surname, Year, page or paragraph number [if available])

      References:

      Personal or Corporate Author. (Last update or copyright date; if not known, put n.d.).

            Title of specific document. Retrieved from URL of specific document

Example

      In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

      (Browning, 1993)

      In-Text Citation (Quotation):

      (Browning, 1993, para. 12)

      References:

      Browning, T. (1993). A brief historical survey of women writers of science fiction.

            Retrieved from http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~tonya/Tonya/sf/history.html

 

 

 

Formulas

Displayed formulas should be numbered consecutively on the right as (1), (2), etc. All characters should be defined and used unambiguously. Standard italicization should be used. When referring to formulas in the text, only numbers in parentheses should be used, for example, (1). At the beginning of sentences, numbers in parentheses should be preceded by the word "equation", for example, Equation (1). 

Tables

Tables should be of a reasonable number and size. Columns should be clearly designed and explanations should be given in footnotes using letters below the table body. Only the first word in each column heading and in each entry of the stub column should be capitalized. Titles should be formatted above the tables as follows: 

Table 1: Real GNP in Germany, 1980–1992 (millions of US dollars) 

Figures

Figures should be complete and clearly drawn. Special care should be taken to ensure that lettering and symbols are of a comparable size and readable. When labeling, initial capitalization should be used. Figures should not be overloaded with information.

 

 

AUTHOR'S CONTRACT

In submitting papers to jomat the authors certify that:

 

They are authorized by their co-authors to enter into the following arrangements. 

They warrant, on behalf of themselves and their co-authors, that:

 

the article is original, has not been formally published in any other peer-reviewed journal, is not under consideration by any other journal and does not infringe upon any existing copyright or any other third party rights;

they are the sole authors of the article and have full authority to enter into this agreement and in granting rights to jomat are not in breach of any other obligation. If the law requires that the paper be published in the public domain, they will notify jomat at the time of submission.

the paper contains nothing that is unlawful, libelous, or which would, if published, constitute a breach of contract or of confidence or of commitment given to secrecy; they have taken due care to ensure the integrity of the article. To their best—and currently accepted scientific—knowledge all statements contained in it purporting to be facts are true and any formula or instruction contained in the article will not, if followed accurately, cause any injury, illness or damage to the user.

The authors agree that their papers may be published by JOMAT under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 (CC-BY-NC).


OPEN ACCESS

JOMAT provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

 

JOMAT adopts an Open Access policy complying with the definition laid out by the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI). Therefore, we take the right of users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles.

 

Sharing of the research results is an important component of the research process; research can only advance by sharing the results, and the value of an investment in research is only maximized through the wide use of its results. Open Access articles are free to all interested readers, and the publishers place no financial or copyright barriers between the readers and the article. 

 

PLAGIARISM POLICY

Prevention of plagiarism is essential as it provides scientific and academic integrity. We use the online software iThenticate to calculate the plagiarism ratio, and we ask at the most %25 ratio (without references) for a submitted paper to assign a section editor.