Cilt 18, Sayı 4, Sayfalar 142 - 159 2017-10-01

Cognitive Load Theory and the Use of Worked Examples as an Instructional Strategy in Physics for Distance Learners: A Preliminary Study

Kim Guan SAW [1]

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This article revisits the cognitive load theory to explore the use of worked examples to teach a selected topic in a higher level undergraduate physics course for distance learners at the School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia. With a break of several years from receiving formal education and having only minimum science background, distance learners need an appropriate instructional strategy for courses that require complex conceptualization and mathematical manipulations. As the working memory is limited, distance learners need to acquire domain specific knowledge in stages to lessen cognitive load. This article charts a learning task with a lower cognitive load to teach Fermi-Dirac distribution and demonstrates the use of sequential worked examples. Content taught in stages using worked examples can be presented as a form of didactic conversation to reduce transactional distance. This instructional strategy can be applied to similar challenging topics in other well-structured domains in a distance learning environment.

Worked examples,cognitive load theory,instructional strategy
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Konular
Dergi Bölümü Volume: 18 Number: 4
Yazarlar

Yazar: Kim Guan SAW
E-posta: kgsaw@usm.my
Ülke: Malaysia


Bibtex @araştırma makalesi { tojde340405, journal = {Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education}, issn = {1302-6488}, address = {Anadolu Üniversitesi}, year = {2017}, volume = {18}, pages = {142 - 159}, doi = {10.17718/tojde.340405}, title = {Cognitive Load Theory and the Use of Worked Examples as an Instructional Strategy in Physics for Distance Learners: A Preliminary Study}, language = {en}, key = {cite}, author = {SAW, Kim Guan} }
APA SAW, K . (2017). Cognitive Load Theory and the Use of Worked Examples as an Instructional Strategy in Physics for Distance Learners: A Preliminary Study. Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education, 18 (4), 142-159. DOI: 10.17718/tojde.340405
MLA SAW, K . "Cognitive Load Theory and the Use of Worked Examples as an Instructional Strategy in Physics for Distance Learners: A Preliminary Study". Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education 18 (2017): 142-159 <http://dergipark.gov.tr/tojde/issue/31263/340405>
Chicago SAW, K . "Cognitive Load Theory and the Use of Worked Examples as an Instructional Strategy in Physics for Distance Learners: A Preliminary Study". Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education 18 (2017): 142-159
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive Load Theory and the Use of Worked Examples as an Instructional Strategy in Physics for Distance Learners: A Preliminary Study AU - Kim Guan SAW Y1 - 2017 PY - 2017 N1 - doi: 10.17718/tojde.340405 DO - 10.17718/tojde.340405 T2 - Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 142 EP - 159 VL - 18 IS - 4 SN - 1302-6488- M3 - doi: 10.17718/tojde.340405 UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.17718/tojde.340405 Y2 - 2017 ER -
EndNote %0 Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education Cognitive Load Theory and the Use of Worked Examples as an Instructional Strategy in Physics for Distance Learners: A Preliminary Study %A Kim Guan SAW %T Cognitive Load Theory and the Use of Worked Examples as an Instructional Strategy in Physics for Distance Learners: A Preliminary Study %D 2017 %J Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education %P 1302-6488- %V 18 %N 4 %R doi: 10.17718/tojde.340405 %U 10.17718/tojde.340405